Milk without the cow: Cellular agriculture could be the future of farming, but dairy farmers need help

 

by Evan Bowness, Robert Newell, Sarah-Louise Ruder, The Conversation

via Phys.org - Jan 13, 2022

 

A new wave of cow-less dairy is hitting the market. In the United States, Perfect Day is using genetically modified fungi to produce milk protein for ice cream at a commercial scale. And pre-commercial companies, like TurtleTree and Better Milk, are engineering mammary cells to produce human and cow milk in laboratories, although these remain in the early stages of development.

 

It might be some time before mammal-less dairy arrives in Canadian grocery stores. But these emerging technologies are part of the fourth agricultural revolution that aims to improve food security, sustainability and agricultural working conditions. With these promises for wins on the horizon, should the diary sector be worried?

 

As researchers from the Food and Agriculture Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley, in British Columbia, we study food systems in transition. The Fraser Valley is home to 60 percent of B.C.'s dairy farms, so we're especially interested in the impacts cellular agriculture might have on the dairy system.

 

Animal agriculture's challenges ...

 

How does cellular agriculture work? ... 

 

What is at stake for dairy farmers? ...

 

Planning a just transition ...

 

more, including links

https://phys.org/news/2022-01-cow-cellular-agriculture-future-farming.html