In this file:

 

·         WA Rancher Sentencing Moved to June 13

Tyson Tells Federal Court Easterday Working to Hinder Recovery of Company Losses

 

·         Lawsuit: Tyson Foods shorted construction firm millions for Gibson County plant

… The lawsuit accuses Tyson officials of operating in “bad faith” ...

 

 

WA Rancher Sentencing Moved to June 13

Tyson Tells Federal Court Easterday Working to Hinder Recovery of Company Losses

 

By Todd Neeley, DTN/Progressive Farmer

1/6/2022

 

LINCOLN, Neb. (DTN) -- Former Washington state rancher Cody Allen Easterday is scheduled to be sentenced on June 13, after a federal judge on Thursday granted a third continuance in a complex case that includes a guilty plea on wire fraud charges in a so-called ghost-cattle scheme and an ongoing massive bankruptcy case.

 

Easterday, who is also involved in an ongoing Chapter 11 bankruptcy dispute regarding the proceeds from a recent $209 million sale of his farm and ranch assets to pay creditors, had asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Eastern Washington for the continuance for sentencing in his criminal case.

 

Easterday could face up to 20 years in prison for defrauding Tyson Fresh Meats and another unnamed company of $244 million for buying and feeding hundreds of thousands of cattle that didn't exist. Easterday was scheduled for sentencing on Jan. 24.

 

According to a declaration filed by Easterday's attorney, the now-former rancher has been working to sell off property to pay creditors. However, an agreement could not be reached by creditors on how to allocate the proceeds from those sales. This has led to a lawsuit filed against Easterday, according to court records, which is set for trial beginning on April 28, 2022.

 

Chief Judge Stanley A. Bastian said during a hearing on the motion Thursday there were a number of reasons for granting the motion.

 

"I'm not continuing this case for convenience for Mr. Easterday. I'm doing this for the convenience of the bankruptcy court," Bastian said.

 

"Part of the mess that has been created here is not just the criminal. Mr. Easterday will face justice and certainly at the appropriate time, but the bankruptcy court and judge (Whitman) Holt have quite a significant case on this docket and they need all the parties present and available to that court to resolve. Mr. Easterday is doing what he promised to do when he pled guilty in my courtroom, to try to help clean this mess up as best that he can and that includes assisting the bankruptcy court."

 

The Easterday Farms property was sold to Farmland Reserve for $209 million after the company connected to the Church of Jesus Christ Latter-day Saints outbid an investment company tied to Microsoft founder Bill Gates.

 

Easterday operated an extensive family farm operation in eastern Washington involved in cattle feeding as well as 22,500 acres of potatoes, onions, corn and wheat in the Columbia Basin.

 

The trial set in the bankruptcy case in eastern Washington, involves a dispute about who should receive the hundreds of millions of dollars in proceeds from a number of sales. Easterday has been actively involved in the sales as a means to pay off creditors.

 

TYSON OPPOSITION ...

 

CRIMINAL CHARGES ...

 

more

https://www.dtnpf.com/agriculture/web/ag/news/business-inputs/article/2022/01/06/tyson-tells-federal-court-easterday

 

 

Lawsuit: Tyson Foods shorted construction firm millions for Gibson County plant

 

By: Anita Wadhwani, Tennessee Lookout

January 5, 2022

 

A construction company has filed a $3.5 million lawsuit against Tyson Foods and the Industrial Development Board of Gibson County, claiming it was shorted payments for building and designing a poultry processing plant in Humboldt, Tenn. last year.

 

The 375,000 square-foot Tyson facility opened in April 2021 on property owned by the Gibson County board and leased to Tyson. At the time, Tyson referred to the project as a $425 million investment. The facility includes a processing plant, feed mill and hatchery. The plant’s construction was made possible, in part, by a $20 million state economic investment package.

 

The federal lawsuit filed on Dec. 29 alleges that Tyson failed to fully pay Gray Construction, the primary contractor on the project. Gray Construction was hired in 2018, but faced a series of delays as a result of other contractors’ missteps, the lawsuit claims. In some instances the construction company had to incur costs to fix problems caused by other contractors, the lawsuit says. Gray Construction also incurred unforeseen expenses as a result of COVID-19, including providing proper protective equipment.

 

The lawsuit accuses Tyson officials of operating in “bad faith” ...

 

more 

https://tennesseelookout.com/briefs/lawsuit-tyson-foods-shorted-construction-firm-millions-for-gibson-county-plant/